Category Archives: watering

Seeds of Hope

Merry meet all,

I love the warm glow of a candle on an overcast wet day. I love gardens and seeds too. I want to talk about how to start seeds in starter pots, because you know, its that time of year!!!

There is more to popping a seed into soil than most people know. It is a bit of an art and a science.

What you will need are seeds, seed starting soil, starter pots, water, and a sunny windowsill. Often, the seed packets come with instructions on where to plant the seeds and how deep and how far apart from other seeds. The size of the seed determines how it gets planted too. Tiny seeds rest on the surface of the soil and larger seeds can be planted deeper in the soil.

Don’t make the mistake I made and put too many seeds in one slot. They will grow better if they are spread out into several slots. I like to fill the starter pot with the right amount of soil and then water it. I let the soil settle then fill the cavity with soil. Then I add the seeds. This avoids the seed drowning in the wet soil and prepares the soil for the seeds. Do not fertilize the soil at this point. That comes much later.

Be sure the starter pot has a hole for water and that you have some form of tray beneath the starter pot. Add the seeds to the soil. If they are large, push them in deep using the end of a pencil. Tiny seeds rest on the surface of the soil. Lightly dust the soil over the seeds. Do not add compost or mulch. Just put the starter pot on the watering tray and then put that onto a sunny windowsill. You can also use grow lights.

At this stage, it is good to wait until a tiny sprout shoots up from the soil. Do not douse the plant in water when you see a sprout. Let the soil dry out between watering. Make sure the seedling gets plenty of sunlight. Also make sure there is a good comfortable temperature in the room.

When a seedling comes up, it will grow its first set of leaves. This is called a cotyledon. Then when it grows the next set of leaves, that is its true leaves. Despite what some sources tell you, its not a good idea to transplant a seedling when the second set of leaves appear. This only confuses the seedling resulting in the plant needing then to put its energy into being moved and adjusting to the new pot. Its energy should be focused on just growing in its present pot. When the roots show beneath or just at the bottom of the starter pot, then you can think of transplantation. Let the plant grow where it is. It is happier that way.

Try not to over water a seedling. It might rot, die off from over watering or its tips might turn brown. When my seedlings were starting out, I added the tiniest amount of water. I knew the sunlight and the soil would sustain them. They don’t need as much water as you believe. Oregano, sage, thyme, these herbs may have come from the Mediterranean. They are accustomed to the hot temperatures there.

Be patient. The seedling is doing the best it can. As a baby plant, like any other newborn, it takes time to grow. It will take a long time to grow to a large size anyway. even years. A true gardener is patient.

I hope this helps you to grow many lovely herbs and flowers!! I wish you luck with it. You can grow anything you want. Once you master how to start from seed, you might not buy seedlings from garden centers again. You will save money starting from your saved seeds too.

I am happy to say that I started a cherry tree from seed outside in my garden!!! I overwintered the seed in the soil. It emerged this spring. I set a circle of stones around the seedling. I also added clean chicken bones to the soil. The bones take 20 to 25 years to decompose or break down. They will become ground bone meal eventually and add nutrients to the seedling. 

I am trying a raised bed area in my garden this year too. I cleared away a patch of dead rotting wood behind the fence of the yard where I live. I used the logs for the raised bed. I plan to fill it with soil then add my indoor seedling transplants I have lovingly tended this spring. I have to clear away weeds and put down newspaper first then I can add soil. I can’t wait. It is my first time trying a raised bed. I am very excited!!!

Blessed  be, Lady Spiderwitch )O(

Leave a comment

Filed under pre-germianation, recipes and lore, ritual, rituals, roots, sacred herbs, saving seeds, seed, seed companies, seed trays, seedheads, seedlings, seeds, seeds and seedlings, snowdrops, soil, spring, spring equinox, spring poems, Spring's arrival, Spring's Rebellion, starter pots, starting gardening, vegetables, veggies, viability, water, watering

An indoor organic vegetable garden

Merry Meet All,

Here are some tips to inspire and energize you for growing seedlings. Think you can’t have an organic indoor veggie garden, at least for growing seeds into seedlings? Think again.

If you have been following my indoor garden veggie salad adventure, then this will be no surprise. But I will recap for those who haven’t. I began with my trays and flats, which I sterilized before starting soil in. I also set on the seed flats in a large glass baking dish. This makes it easier to water, as I can water from below and not need to worry about water dripping everywhere. That helps plants develop strong roots and does not disrupt the tender emerging roots.

I planted the organic vegatable seeds in the mix, watered and fertilized, and set them in the flats. I also wrote down what I planted where so I could remember what I planted. I used an egg carton as well to hold seeds and soil. Now I have tiny shoots emerging and I wish i could impress upon you all just how exciting is to watch them grow. The seeds receive tons of sunlight and a breeze from the open window.

As an extra, I cut a bit off from the bottom end of a scallion and stuck that in some soil. The scallion roots took hold and the scallion is now a few inches high. I also sliced off an inch or two from the top of a carrot and suspended the carrot top in a bowl of water. Tiny carrot tops now reach for the sun.

I started a tomato plant from seed this spring too. I fermented the seeds and saved them in a freezer for a few days. I put the seed in soil in a Jiffy pot, left the seed in the pot in a dark corner for a few days and honestly forgot about it. I checked sometime later and removed the pot from the dark glass, and placed the seedling to grow in the sun on a windowsill.

I just transplanted my tomato seedling into a recycled milk carton. I cut the milk carton in half, cut a hole in the bottom for drainage, added a clear quartz crystal to stop the soil from spilling out, + moistened the potting mix. I dug out the tomato seedling from the Jiffy pot with a fork, and planted it carefully in the milk carton, nestling it securely in the damp soil. I fertilized it with my organic Neptune’s harvest fish emulsion fertilizer, and some stuff that encourages deep root growth, and set the carton on the tray with the other seedlings. Now the tomato plant can grow strong roots. This is important so it can grow healthy ripe tomatoes. This may all seem like a lot of effort at first, but it is all vitally important for the plant. There is lots of room in the milk carton for the roots to form.

The tomato transplant is shown in the milk carton in the photo below:

I have turned a large glass container into a jar for compost tea for my garden. I fill it with eggshells, coffee grains, teabags. I set a plastic bag over the lid and tied an elastic to secure the plastic and keep pests out. You cannot use a glass lid or the jar will explode. The compost tea will be for my garden. I also mixed five bags of soil over my garden and fed it a healthy dose of the last of my bonemeal. The garden looks purdy with dark rich organic black soil. Plants will emerge and grow strong now.

I have an indoor veggie garden! Of course, soon the frost will pass, and I can tuck my seedlings outdoors in the large planter, where they will receive light. Their roots will have more room to grow. Of course, the bugs may want their share. I plan to set a type of protective cover over the seedlings, like chicken wire. I have planted lovage from seed and I am waiting for the lovage to germinate. Lovage looks like celery and smells more like aniseed. So it is exciting, this venture of mine. I promise to update you all regularly on how it goes. Till then, happy planting!!

Blessed Be,
Lady Spiderwitch )O(

Leave a comment

Filed under carrots, egg cartons, environmentally friendly, fertilizer, Indoor vegetable garden, milk cartons, organic, peas, recycling, scallions, watering